Google Sued for Nixing Free Workspace Software to Early Adopters

In 2012, Google started charging new customers $12 (roughly Rs. 950) a month to use the software.

Google Sued for Nixing Free Workspace Software to Early Adopters

In 2022, Google notified legacy users that they would also be charged

Highlights
  • Google started charging new customers $12 (roughly Rs. 950) a month
  • The early adopters were promised a free version of Workspace
  • Some of the programmes are free to all

Alphabet's Google was sued by an early adopter of its Workplace cloud productivity software who claims the company reneged on a promise to provide it with free access to the program for life.
Google Workplace, formerly known as Google Apps and G Suite, provides a host of services including Gmail, Calendar, Drive for storage and Google Docs for content creation. Some of the programmes are free to all, but enterprise features such as custom email addresses and shared Drive storage cost extra.

The Stratford Company LLC sued on behalf of all early adopters who were lured to use the software in its early stages, allowing Google to fine-tune it and then sell it for a fee. In exchange Stratford Company said the early adopters were promised a free version of Workspace as long as Google offered it.

In 2012, Google started charging new customers $12 (roughly Rs. 950) a month to use the software. Then, in 2022, Google notified legacy users that they would also be charged, although it later excluded non-business users of the software.

“Google's abandonment of the credo ‘don't be evil' is well-illustrated in this case,” Stratford Company said in the complaint, filed Friday in San Jose federal court. “Google, as the better part of a conglomerate worth nearly two trillion dollars, breaks a promise to loyal customers who helped Google develop a profitable product, in order to pad its already grossly outsized profits.”

Stratford company is seeking class-action status for all the early adopters and damages to be determined at trial, but more than $5 million (roughly Rs. 40 crore).

Google didn't immediately respond to an emailed request for comment, sent after regular business hours.

The case is The Stratford Company LLC v. Google LLC, 5:22-cv-4547, US District Court, Northern District of California (San Jose).

© 2022 Bloomberg LP


What should you make of Realme's three new offerings? We discuss them on Orbital, the Gadgets 360 podcast. Orbital is available on Spotify, Gaana, JioSaavn, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music and wherever you get your podcasts.
Affiliate links may be automatically generated - see our ethics statement for details.
Comments

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Google News. For the latest videos on gadgets and tech, subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Further reading: Google, Alphabet
Researchers to Scan Ocean Floor for Meteorite That Crashed on Earth in 2014
Share on Facebook Tweet Snapchat Share Reddit Comment google-newsGoogle News
 
 

Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement

© Copyright Red Pixels Ventures Limited 2022. All rights reserved.